30Mar 2022

16 Tips for Web Designers To Provide People With Accessibility Needs

Web accessibility, in a nutshell, allows individuals with disabilities to understand, interact with, and contribute to the web. Web designers should make site experiences that can be used, understood, and accessed by people of all visual, auditory, cognitive, and physical disabilities.

When it comes to resolving accessibility concerns, one of the most difficult tasks for web designers and content providers is trying to cram accessible solutions into a design that has already been completed. A far more simple approach would be to start with the design, inclusive of persons with disabilities, from the ground up.

Best Practices for Making Your UX & UI Design More Accessible to Persons with Disabilities

Here are some helpful best web designing practices for making your UX & UI design more accessible to persons with disabilities.

1. Use clear and concise language

People with cognitive disabilities may have difficulty understanding complex or abstract language. So try to use simple, easy-to-read language whenever possible and avoid using jargon or technical terms.

2. Use consistent layout and design principles

People with cognitive disabilities may have difficulty processing information if the layout or design of a page changes frequently. Try to use a consistent layout throughout your site, and make sure to use familiar web designing principles so that users can easily navigate your site.

3. Use images sparingly

Images can be difficult for people with visual impairments to understand and process. Web designing should be done in such a way that it use images sparingly. Don’t forget that alternative text (alt-text) is provided for each image so that people who are unable to see the image can understand what it depicts.

4. Use color in a meaningful way

Color is an important part of the web designing process, but using color to convey meaning or information has the potential to be confusing for people with visual impairments. Because of it, try to use color consistently throughout your site – think about using one set of colors when designing buttons so that you don’t have multiple colors that all look alike. Also, always include a text alternative for any colored text that conveys meaning (e.g., if a user sees “Click here,” provide alt-text stating “Click here” instead of just showing this as purple text.)

5. Make sure your pages appear correctly in different browsers and operating systems

People with disabilities may not be able to access your site if the pages only display properly in one type of browser or computer operating system. Test your site to make sure it can be used by all types of users, including those who are blind and use screen reader software, people with low vision or color deficiencies, and people with dexterity disabilities.

6. Consider allowing users to control the size of objects on the page

People who have low vision may need their screen magnification software to enlarge text on web pages for ease of reading. People with cognitive disabilities may also want to control how large certain elements (such as video players) appear on the page so that they do not take up too much space or interfere with other content. Web designing should allow users to customize their own viewing preferences whenever possible.

7. Use clear and concise headings and titles

People with cognitive disabilities may scan pages for information by looking for headings and titles. Make sure your headings are clear and concise and use them to organize your content in a way that is easy to understand.

8. Offer multiple ways to access information

People with different disabilities may need different means of accessing the information on a website. So so web designing should provide multiple methods for accessing information, such as through text, audio, or video.

9. Make use of keyboard shortcuts

People who have dexterity disabilities may not be able to use a mouse or trackpad to navigate a website. Make use of keyboard shortcuts whenever possible so that they can still interact with your site.

10. Test your site with assistive devices

Services like the Accessibility Evaluation Tool (AET) can help you check if your site is complying with WAI guidelines, and allow you to find errors or other issues that cause problems for users. Other options for testing your site include screen readers or even specific browsers that are used by people with disabilities. Always use tools that are relevant to your audience to ensure that your website works effectively across different types of technologies.

11. Get feedback from users with disabilities

The best way to make sure your website is accessible is to get feedback from users who have disabilities. Try to find people with a variety of disabilities, and ask them how easy (or difficult) it is for them to use your site. Take their feedback into account when redesigning or updating your website.

12. Use the WCAG 2.0 guidelines as a resource

The WCAG 2.0 guidelines are a set of standards that help web designers create pages that are accessible for everyone. While not all of these guidelines will be relevant for every website, using these as a resource can help you create a page that is more inclusive for everyone.

13. Stay up-to-date on new recommendations and resources

Keep abreast of new developments in web accessibility, as well as new recommendations from organizations like the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the U.S. Access Board for Section 508 compliance. New technologies are constantly being developed that can make websites more accessible to users with disabilities, so it’s important to stay up-to-date on what is available.

14. Advocate for web accessibility

As a web designer, you have the power to make a difference in the accessibility of websites around the world. Educate your clients and employers about the importance of web accessibility, and work to create an inclusive environment where everyone can access the information they need.

If you’re going to be completing your project with web accessibility in mind, bring it to the notice of your client. You can even mention it in your business proposal so that they are aware of it and expect it from all other businesses and freelancers they work with in the future.

15. Use resources like the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)

The WAI is an organization that provides resources and recommendations for making websites accessible to people with disabilities. Their website includes case studies, tutorials, and other information on how to make your website more inclusive.

16. Stay positive and patient

Making your website accessible can be a challenging process. It is important work that makes a real in the lives of many people. Stay positive and patient as you work to improve the accessibility of your website. Also, be prepared to make changes to your design based on feedback from users with disabilities.

Examples of Websites with Features for Users with Disabilities

With these design tips in mind, let’s review examples of websites. Which has features that make them easier to navigate for people with disabilities.

1. The Trevor Project

 The Trevor Project
The Trevor Project

Their website includes a range of features that make it accessible to users with disabilities. Including closed captioning for videos, a text-based menu for users who cannot use a mouse or trackpad, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site. The Trevor Project is a non-profit organization that provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ young people ages 13-24.

2. The National Library of Medicine

 The National Library of Medicine
2. The National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library. It provides information resources to researchers and health professionals around the globe. Their website includes a wide range of features that make it accessible to users with disabilities. It includes closed captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site.

3. The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)
3. The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

The AFB is a non-profit organization that provides advocacy and education opportunities to blind and low-vision individuals around the world. Their website includes a wide range of features that make it accessible to users with disabilities, including close captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files. The screen reader compatibility (users who use screen readers can click on an image and their browser will read the text associated with that image).

4. National Public Radio (NPR)

National Public Radio (NPR)
National Public Radio (NPR)

NPR is an independent media organization that delivers breaking national and world news through radio, podcasts, and multimedia webcasts. Their website includes a variety of features and it adds convenience to users with disabilities such as keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site. A text-based menu for users who cannot use a mouse or trackpad, and transcripts for audio files.

5. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC is a national public health institute that provides information and resources on health topics to people around the world. Their web designers have included a variety of features that make the website accessible to users with disabilities, including closed captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site.

6. The American Diabetes Association (ADA)

6. The American Diabetes Association (ADA)
6. The American Diabetes Association (ADA)

The ADA is a non-profit organization that provides diabetes education and support to people around the world. Their web designers have included a number of features that make the website easier to for users with disabilities, including closed captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site.

7. The United States Department of Labor (DOL)

7. The United States Department of Labor (DOL)
7. The United States Department of Labor (DOL)

The DOL is a government agency that provides information on labor laws and regulations to people around the world. Their web designers have included a variety of features that make the website accessible to users with disabilities, including closed captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site.

8. JSTOR

JSTOR
JSTOR

Their web designers have included a number of features that make the website easier to use for people with disabilities, including close captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and is free to the public.

9. The National Archives (NARA)

The National Archives (NARA)
The National Archives (NARA)

The NARA is an independent federal agency whose website contains records of historical significance related to American culture and history. Their web designers have included a variety of features that make the website accessible to users with disabilities including closed captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigation.

10. The New York Times

The New York Times
The New York Times

The NYT is one of the most recognized newspapers in the world. Their website includes a variety of features that make it accessible to users with disabilities. It includes closed captioning for videos, transcripts for audio files, and keyboard shortcuts for navigating the site.

#Conclusion

With the rapid growth in social media, websites are more than just a tool for staying connected to friends and family. They’re also one of the main ways people find out about what’s happening in the world. From entertaining videos to news articles that inform readers about current events, many websites today provide information that’s important for people with disabilities. It makes them great candidates to learn tips on how to make their website more accessible.

Acodez is an award-winning web designing company in India. We have a bunch of multi-talented web designers and developers to provide the best UX design experiences to our clients. Apart from offering web development services, we are also a leading digital marketing agency in India, with a clientele across 80+ countries. For more information, contact us.

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Rithesh Raghavan

Rithesh Raghavan

Rithesh Raghavan, Co-Founder, and Director at Acodez IT Solutions, who has a rich experience of 16+ years in IT & Digital Marketing. Between his busy schedule, whenever he finds the time he writes up his thoughts on the latest trends and developments in the world of IT and software development. All thanks to his master brain behind the gleaming success of Acodez.

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